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Neuropathology and Virus in Brain of SARS-CoV-2 Infected Non-Human Primates

Indica Labs / Spotlight on Covid-19 Research Publications  / Neuropathology and Virus in Brain of SARS-CoV-2 Infected Non-Human Primates

Neuropathology and Virus in Brain of SARS-CoV-2 Infected Non-Human Primates

Rutkai, I., Mayer, M.G., Hellmers, L.M., et al. Neuropathology and Virus in Brain of SARS-CoV-2 Infected Non-Human Primates. This article is a preprint and has not been certified by peer review. DOI: 10.21203/rs.3.rs-59871/v1

Neurological manifestations are a significant complication of coronavirus infection disease-19 (COVID-19). Understanding how COVID-19 contributes to neurological disease is needed for appropriate treatment of infected patients, as well as in initiating relevant follow-up care after recovery. Investigation of autopsied brain tissue has been key to advancing our understanding of the neuropathogenesis of a large number of infectious and non-infectious diseases affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Due to the highly infectious nature of the etiologic agent of COVID-19, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), there is a paucity of tissues available for comprehensive investigation. Here, we show for the first time, microhemorrhages and neuropathology that is consistent with hypoxic injury in SARS-CoV-2 infected non-human primates (NHPs). Importantly, this was seen among infected animals that did not develop severe respiratory disease. This finding underscores the importance of vaccinating against SARS-CoV-2, even among populations that have a reduced risk for developing of severe disease, to prevent long-term or permanent neurological sequelae. Sparse virus was detected in brain endothelial cells but did not associate with the severity of CNS injury. We anticipate our findings will advance our current understanding of the neuropathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection and demonstrate SARS-CoV-2 infected NHPs are a highly relevant animal model for investigating COVID-19 neuropathogenesis among human subjects.

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